critical analysis essay

Question # 40573
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    6 months ago
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    6 months ago

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    Hey.
    I need a critical analysis essay of 5 pages for my literature class

     here is all the details you need. And the Story is "Barn Burning" by William Faulkner


    HERE IS THE DETAIL Below
    PLEASE LOOK THROUGH EVERYTHING BEFORE YOU DO IT.

    __________________________________________________________

    The Essays

    The Essay Assignment

    Students must write 1 critical analysis essays that argues a specific thesis, or controlling idea, that is specific and arguable. The essay should identify either a specific feature an author’s work, in general, or a specific work for investigation and analysis. The essay should address an "arguable" point defined in a thesis that is clearly identified and developed throughout the essay.

    The essay should be about 4-5 pages in length, at least 1000 word (not counting Works Cited page), and incorporate at least four secondary sources (articles from journals, etc. about the literary work) from the CPCC databases (The Literature Resource Center, for example). Other appropriate critical sources can be used from a broader web search. Many great sources are available on the web, but you must evaluate these sources for credibility, and these should be used in addition to the four sources from the databases. Avoid Wikipedia, online encyclopedias, basic overviews like Cliff’s Notes, etc.  So there should be a total of at least 5 sources- 4 secondary sources and the primary source.

    The essay should be written using MLA formatting. You should follow standard rules for citing sources (including appropriate in-text citations for primary and secondary sources) and the Works Cited.

    There will be a deduction for late essay of up to 20%. If an essay has not been submitted after 1 week (without documented, extreme situation, at the instructor’s discretion), the essay grade will be a zero.

    The essay must meet basic standards for documentation and use of sources to receive a passing grade. Essays will be submitted through SafeAssign. Issues of plagiarism can receive an automatic F for the class and may face further academic sanctions.

    The introduction should include information about the author, not a complete biography, but enough information to create a context for understanding the work, including major themes, cultural and philosophical influences, or any specific reference to the work by the author that might add clarity to understanding. The introduction of the essay should also present the main points that you will be addressing about the work.

    The essay should have a title that informs the read about the subject and engages the reader about what is to come.  

    The essay should be about 4-5 pages in length, at least 1000 word (not counting Works Cited page), and should incorporate:

    Quotes from the primary source (the literary work under discussion in the essay) to support interpretation

     Important elements to address in writing the essay:

    Clearly defines thesis or focus for analysis

    Exhibits examples of close reading and analysis of primary work in question

    Effectively supports thesis with evidence from the primary source AND secondary sources

    Provides a thorough review of the literature on the work in question

    Chooses a relevant structure/organizational strategy

    Writing meets all standards of correctness

    Adopts a suitable style and voice

    Integrates/incorporates research effectively

    Uses proper citation techniques and documents research appropriately

    The Rubric for Evaluation: Critical Research Essay

    Thesis (10%)

    95-Identifiable, specific, creates a point that is engaging and arguable (meaning that it makes a specific assertion that will be proven through discussion and analysis), sophisticated idea and language

    85-Identifiable, specific, creates a point that is arguable, clear, used academic voice.

    75-Identifiable, may be a bit general, but a relevant idea about the work and/or period.

    65-Identifiable, too general

    55-Not identifiable, unclear, misplaced, or inappropriate

    Structure/Organization (20%)

    190--95-Clear, logical, overall structure is logical- without gaps, appropriate transitions, paragraphs well developed and maintains paragraph unity, focused

    170--85-Clear and logical, transitions not as strong but logical, paragraphs maintain unity, correct and focused

    150--75-Clear, logical structural, paragraphs generally correct, but some concerns with unity and/or focus, issues do not affect logic or credibility

    130--65-Lacking clarity or logic in some areas; concerns with overall organization; issues with paragraph unity or focus.

    110--55-Critical issues with logic, focus, paragraph unity and structure

    Mechanics/Style (20%)

    190-95-No errors (or only minor errors) in sentence structure, grammar, mechanics, or usage, appropriate variety in sentence structure, demonstrates knowledge of conventions; clear, concise style, academic voice; no issues with coherence.

    170-85-Generally correct-only a few errors, some variety in sentence structure; no issues with coherence.

    150-75-Generally correct, only a few errors, sentences correct but may not be as varied in sentence structure. May be some gaps but generally maintains coherence

    130-65-Some errors, issues with correctness or sentence structure (fragments, fused sentences, or comma splice errors), gaps in info or connections that affect coherence.

    110-55-Too many errors, issues in correctness, sentence structure; issues with coherence- sentences lack connection or flow.

    (Essay must be basic standard to receive a passing grade- too many errors in sentence structure, grammar, mechanics, or usage)

    Development (15%)

    143--95 -Ideas explained, support provided, all areas covered; meets guidelines, but ideas developed fully. Discusses specific idea related to the work and puts idea in context of period.

    128--85 -Ideas explained, support provided, some areas could be developed more fully; meets guidelines. Discusses specific idea related to the work and puts idea in context of period.

    113--75 -Ideas explained, support provided, sufficient; meets guidelines. Discusses specific idea related to the work but context not developed.

    98--65 -lacking in support or development, ideas not sufficiently explained or examined; specific context not developed; does not meet guidelines.

    83--55 -not developed to meet expectations. Lacking development or does not meet guidelines.

    (Essay must be basic standard to receive a passing grade; should be at least 60% of the minimum length)

     

    Documentation (15%)

    143--95-No errors in format as assigned.

    128--85-Uses proper format with perhaps only a few minor errors (details like commas, hanging indent, capitalization)

    113--75-Uses proper MLA format but with some errors (some info missing but source still clear)

    98--65-Significant errors with format (some info missing that makes source unclear, inconsistent citing of sources through essay, etc.)

    83--55-Failed to meet standards of MLA format; sources on Works Cited not cited in text; sources in text not on Works Cited; simply using urls; significant information missing; etc.

    (Essay must be basic standard for documentation and use of sources to receive a passing grade)

    Use of Sources (20%)

    190- all sources are academically appropriate; whether quotes, summary, or paraphrase, effectively incorporated (introduce source info, used source info, discuss, analyze, provide commentary on source info), elaborates on info from source and connects to other info in the essay that comes before and after; if summary or paraphrase, wording completely changed from author’s original text to avoid overuse and possible plagiarism.

    170- all sources are academically appropriate; whether quotes, summary, or paraphrase, effectively incorporated, but possibly without depth or level of discussion, commentary or analysis; if summary or paraphrase, wording completely changed from author’s original text to avoid overuse and possible plagiarism; if summary or paraphrase, wording completely changed from author’s original text to avoid overuse and possible plagiarism.

    150- all sources are academically appropriate; incorporated to the degree that it is clear when sources are used but doesn’t elaborate on source info as fully, some comment, discussion, or analysis; whether quotes, summary, or paraphrase, effectively incorporated, but possibly without depth or level of discussion, commentary or analysis; if summary or paraphrase, wording completely changed from author’s original text to avoid overuse and possible plagiarism; if summary or paraphrase, wording completely changed from author’s original text to avoid overuse and possible plagiarism.

    130- some source are not as strong academically; essay does not meet requirements for use or number of sources. Information from the source is used, but not connected or incorporated effective; whether quotes, summary, or paraphrase used, but possibly depth or appropriate level of discussion, commentary or analysis; if summary or paraphrase, wording completely changed from author’s original text to avoid overuse and possible plagiarism; little discussion, commentary or analysis; if summary or paraphrase, wording completely changed from author’s original text to avoid overuse and possible plagiarism.

    110- sources not academically suitable; essay falls far short of required use and number of sources. Sources not connected or incorporated, but rather appear without logical connection or context; quotes used inappropriately; failure to paraphrase or summarize appropriately- too much of author’s language = possible plagiarism.

    Essay must be basic standard for documentation and use of sources to receive a passing grade.

    Notes on Developing the Essay

    It may help if you view the essay, any essay, as an argument. You should have a specific thesis with reasons and evidence which support the thesis. Within the essay you should use quotes from the text of the story or stories to support the thesis. In addition, you should include literary research for further support.

    Thesis and Support

    I would start with an author or a particular piece from the reading that you find interesting or compelling. "The Yellow Wall-Paper" was a particularly interesting story. The woman in the story was trapped by society's expectations in a male dominated society, which was represented by the role her husband played in responding to her "illness" and in controlling her behavior.

    I would then turn to the literary criticism of the story and/or of Gilman's work. What do the critics say about this? The guidelines for the assignment note that to get an A, you must have at least 4 critical, secondary sources. You may, however, have more.

    Then go to the text of the story and find specific examples that suggest how she was trapped by society and her husband's role in implementing those restrictions. All this is done before you start writing.

    Organizing

    Again, before writing, organize the ideas and information you have. The basic unit of organization in writing is the paragraph, which must have a topic sentence that identifies one idea, and only one idea, that each paragraph will be about. Though I don't usually use a formal outline, these sub-tops (the paragraph ideas) represent the elements of the outline- the Roman numerals, if you will. These sub-topics could be ideas such as:

     The woman's role in society during the time period;

     The effects of the "rest cure" and how it forces women to relinquish control;

     The husband's role in "enforcing" the "rest cure" and the way he relates to his wife;

     The effects on the wife in the story

    Each of these sub-topics may have more than one paragraph, so you would need specific topic sentences that analyze, break down, each idea further.

    Drafting

    Only when this is done should you start to actually write the essay. The concept of drafting give you the freedom to write with the ideas that you will revise to clarify, explain more where needed, analyze further after further reflection. As you approach your final draft, your attention should turn to editing for correctness- grammar, mechanic and usage.

    Documentation and Use of Sources

    Information from other sources must be clearly identified whether you summarize, paraphrase, or quote directly.

    If you use an online source, introduce the author (if there is one) and the title in leading to the information. Then use the information. For an online source, this is all that is necessary (this would include anything that comes from the Literature Resource Center databases through the library.

    For information from a book or journal (including the textbook), you must indicate the author or editor and the page number in parenthesis. For example:

    "John says if I don't pick up faster he shall send me to Weir Mitchell in the fall?" (Gilman 582).

    The Works Cited entry for this source should look like this:

    Gilman, Charlotte Perkins. "The Yellow Wall-Paper." The Norton Anthology of American Literature, Shorter 8th Edition, Volume 2. Ed. Nina Baym.   New York: Norton &Company,  2013. 485- 497.

    You may also use the introductory information on the author included in the text.

    The Works Cited entry would look like this:

    "Charlotte Perkins Gilman 1860-1935." The Norton Anthology of American Literature, Shorter 8th Edition, Volume 2. Ed. Nina Baym.   New York: Norton &Company,  2013.

    . 577-578. 484- 485.

    Using the Literature Resource Center

    Lanser, Susan S. "Feminist Criticism, 'The Yellow Wallpaper,' and the Politics of Color in America." Twentieth-Century Literary Criticism, edited by Thomas J. Schoenberg, vol. 201, Gale, 2008. Literature Resource Center, ezproxy.cpcc.edu/login?url=http://go.galegroup.com/ps/i.do?p=LitRC&sw=w&u=nclivecpcc&v=2.1&it=r&id=GALE%7CH.... Accessed 9 Aug. 2017. Originally published in Feminist Studies, vol. 15, no. 3, Fall 1989, pp. 415-441.

     NOTE: For Works Cited Entries: Every line after the first in each entry should be indented.

    Tips for Research and Writing: Using the CPCC research database for literary research

    The Literature Resource Center through the CPCC library is a great source for articles on all of these authors.

    1. CPCC

    2. Library

    3. Research Databases

    4. Arts, Literature, & Humanities

    5. Select the Literature Resource Center

    6. type your author's name

    7. Click on your author

    8. You will several tabs: choose "Literature Criticism"

    9. Review title and content of articles that apply to your topic

     Punctuating Titles

    Books (most of the books in the Heath are presented as chapter excerpts--you'll know this because the excerpt will be listed as from The Jungle, or from The Promised Land): books, either fiction or nonfiction, are typed with italics or underlined. I don't care which--just be consistent and if you are using the underline feature, do not underline periods.

     Plays are in italics or underlined

     Long Poems (like The Wasteland) are italicized

     Newspapers, Magazines, Films, Television Shows, CD or Album titles, titles of Paintings and Sculptures are all italicized

    "Short Stories" go in quotation marks, as do: "Poems," "Songs," "Essays" or "Articles," and "Episodes of a Television Show."

    NOTE: Periods and commas go inside quotation marks: the only exception is when the quote is cited in a research paper, and then the period goes "after the citation" (MLA 240).

    A good thesis statement identifies the topic and purpose of your essay, but you should also think of a literary thesis as an argument. What is the essay going to prove about your topic? This approach helps you define the purpose.

    A primary source is first-hand information on the topic. So for this type of assignment, the primary source would be the literary work. Identify quotes from the primary source to support or illustrate the thesis.

    Secondary sources, articles on your subject that you find by researching your topic, should support your analysis or ideas on the topic. Sources can be used for information but should be used as the basis for analysis.  When using sources, incorporate your research by introducing the source to indicate the purpose and after using the source, provide commentary or analysis to establish relevance.

    Any  source is used in the essay, whether it is quoted directly, paraphrased, summarized or the idea from the source was used in the essay, the source must be cited or referenced using MLA format and an appropriate entry should appear on the Works Cited page.

    In addition to secondary sources, use the text(s) of the literary work to support your thesis.

    Some references to plot can be made for context, but do not summarize the entire story (it is ok to summarize a relevant scene that supports an idea).

    The thesis not only gives the topic and purpose, but also suggests the logical development of the essay. Make sure that you use appropriate transitions to maintain the logic.

    The introduction gives background and context, engages the reader and generally ends with the thesis.

    The body of the essay focuses specifically on logically proving the thesis.

    The conclusion, re-emphasized the key point (not restates), discusses implications of argument, and provides closure.

    Organize in clearly defined paragraphs (good topic sentences and paragraph unity).

    Writing should be clear and concise. In revision, read sentence by sentence for clarity. Cut unnecessary words.

    Review rules for documentation and use of sources.

    Critical Requirements for Documentation

    ·         MLA 8th edition format.

    ·         Works Cited entries should start with either the author, or if no author, the title in quotation marks for articles.  The item that comes first on the Works Cited entry will be the link to the in-text citation in the text of the essay.

    ·         Indent every line after the first in each entry.

    ·         List entries in alphabetical order.

    ·         See model for sources from library databases.

    ·         Even though internet doesn’t, follow traditional rules for punctuation: capitalize first and last words in the title and all important word in between.

    ·         Check punctuation. Period comes inside the quotation mark.

    You MUST document all info that comes from sources. If this is not done, the essay will receive an F. Using sources without documentation is plagiarism, intentional or unintentional.

    To emphasize, any time a source is used, it must be documented. It doesn't matter whether it is summarized, paraphrased or quoted.  If it is summarized or paraphrased, the information must be COMPLETELY reworded. You can't just shift a few words around and use synonyms.

    Structure for essay on "The Raven"

    Introduction

    Introduce the author, the work, some context for the poem, and lead to your thesis.

    Topic sentence: The tone of the poem is important in understanding its effect.

    As B.J. Bolden suggests in his essay, “An Overview of ‘The Raven,’” a deep melancholy is present in the beginning stages of the poem.

    “The poem opens with an overwhelming sense of melancholy…”

    Find quotes from the poem (the primary source) that suggest this melancholy tone.

    Complete paragraph by explaining the effect this has leading to the appearance of the raven.

    Transition/Topic sentence: But this sense of melancholy soon leads to feeling that allows the reader, and the subject in the poem, to spend some time debating the possibilities that the raven suggests. The new feeling is a “spirit of "charmed mistrust," in Richard Wilbur's felicitous phrase, is afloat in the sea of Poe criticism generally, and it assumes a variety of forms, some more troubled than charmed (Freedman).

    Complete the paragraph by explaining goes through the process of doubt, hope, and finally despair.

    Topic sentences to follow- (find sources to support each idea from primary source and secondary sources)

                    Paragraph about Doubt

                    Paragraph about Hope

                    Paragraph about Despair

    Transition to a section discussing how “The Raven” suggests major elements of Poe’s body of work

    Topic sentences to follow-

                    Paragraph about “confrontations with mysterious presences” (Edgar Allen Poe…)

                    Paragraph about “memory of and mourning for the dead” (Edgar Allen Poe…)

    Works Cited

    Bolden, B. J. "An overview of “The Raven”." Poetry for Students, Gale. Literature Resource Center, http://link.galegroup.com/apps/doc/H1420006716/LitRC?u=centralp&sid=LitRC&xid=8f1cdc78. Accessed 7 Nov. 2018.

    Freedman, William. "Poe's 'Raven': The Word That Is an Answer 'Nevermore.'." Poetry Criticism, edited by Timothy J. Sisler, vol. 54, Gale, 2004. Literature Resource Center, http://link.galegroup.com/apps/doc/H1420056249/LitRC?u=centralp&sid=LitRC&xid=1c767cb1. Accessed 7 Nov. 2018. Originally published in Poe Studies/Dark Romanticism: History Theory, Interpretation, vol. 31, no. 1, 1998, pp. 23-31.

    “Edgar Allan Poe (1809-1849): Brief Lecture Notes.” American Literature: Washington State University, https://public.wsu.edu/~campbelld/amlit/poenotes.html

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